Mercedes-Benz GLA Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Had my car in for it's first Service since purchasing it last fall. Car only has 23K on it right now for a 2016, so no complaints! Service Dept was trying to tell me the plugs needed to be changed out "due to age". Didn't know there was an age to look at as well as mileage. Anyone else run into this? Is this legit or just typical Mercedes dealers?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,662 Posts
Age has become more of a factor due to aluminum blocks. The plugs are a different metal and electrolysis can occur that partially "welds" the plug to the block.

To make matters worse plugs are now coated to minimize this problem but to be effective this precludes the use of anti seize compound.

BTW ... This coating gets scraped off during installation so it is I'll advised to remove a plug and then reuse it.

Also BTW ... Anti seize acts as a lubricant and using it on plugs can result in over tightening which can damage the block or cause the plug to break or fail. NGK had a great explanation on their website.

Back to you're question ... Generally four years is the change period. There are many who object but I will state from changing my 997.2 plugs three times now (every 40K miles), as well as those on friend's Porsches, that the plugs creak all the way out. This is unnerving. And is due to the different metals (particles) grabbing each other. And if you reverse the turn direction (like you would of you were allowing chips to release while tapping new threads ... There are no flutes in a spark plug to release the particles) those particles dig in and removal becomes even more difficult.

Anyway, I am a proponent for changing the plugs more frequently.

That being said I have not tackled this job on Pam's 45 yet nor have I seen a DIY for this task. If anyone here has done this I'm sure there are many that would love a write up.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
623 Posts
MB has a service schedule for most everything based on miles or age. So the dealers will use this miles/age and will suggest service using the chart. Sort of comes under the heading preventive maintenance. I take it in for a service "A" and when they come to me about other items I tell them NO. I then either DIY or have an indy to do it. Just had a MB SLK in for service and they wanted to repack front wheel bearing for $338 and do front brakes for $895. My indy did everything for $250. Yes they were going to replace rotors and only having 43k the rotors were fine and the indy did not replace the rotors but did everything else. Brake pads were down to 5mm out of 12mm so they suggested replacing. They also wanted to do an engine air filter because of 40k miles. I DIY myself and save something like $50 plus. The only reason I use the dealer for service A is they give a free wheel alignment, do a very good inspection, and check and do any service campaigns free or recalls that I did not get notice. Pay a little more than just having an oil change but does offer a little peace of mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the feedback! Yeah they wanted like $350 for the plugs... yeah no thanks I can manage that myself. Changed them dozens of times on mine and friends cars. Prolly get them replaced myself for $40 (guessing, need to check on prices for the best plugs).
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
352 Posts
Do be careful Doug with your 'plug selection. I once installed E3 'plugs in an Audi A5, which were supposedly certified for same, but the ECU didn't like them at all. I would say best to get OEM 'plugs and then self-install.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Copper anti-seize is for dissimilar metals.

I use a lot of Denso TT plugs, they work great. Also they have been winning at LeMans for a few years now. Not sure about MB fitment. I would not worry about changing before 4-5yr/60k+.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
352 Posts
I even use copper anti-seize on the wheel hub/lug mating surface to make [dissimilar metal] wheel removal a bit easier (but never near the wheel lugs of course).
Some newer 'plugs do not require anti-seize so as always check the manufacturer's recommendations. I concur that they don't need to be changed as often as in the ol' days.
btw: I used to use copper anti-seize on brake caliper wear surfaces (but not near the pad/rotor surfaces) however I now use the high temp synthetic specifically made for same.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top