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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had many Mercedes. It this is my first certified.
Much was posted about service types, but it’s still not clear to me:
1. I would think that the first service is the A service. And that after he A service at 10,000, a B service follows. Then why does my car display A service due soon? Did they reset the counter wrong ?
2. What’s this thing with the A0, B3 and so on services ? Is that the first service in the row and so on?
3. I looked at the list of what’s done in the A service. I also looked at a video of what was done in an A service for a W124. I mean that was 2 hours worth of work maybe ?
Grease the door locks with Mercedes grease, align doors hood and trunk, check parking position of wipers, orient jets of windshield, rear window and headlights washers, etc, where are all those ?
4. To me, from that small List of what is done in A, the ones I’d love to get are cleaning and regreasing of the sunroof and brake fluid flush.
how could I Even check that the brake flush happened ? I may have to ask the service manager to show me.
I just have a dealer trust problem.
 

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1. The A and B services alternate each year or by mileage. Presumably they did the much more thorough B service to certify pre-owned and therefore your next due is A.
2. Yes, presumably.
3. Yes, the A service is relatively minor with oil change, checks and adjustments. B however is significantly more extensive.
4. Yes, cleaning the sunroof drains and lubricating the runners is oft overlooked. See DIY video below.
The only real way to tell if your brake fluid was flushed/replaced is if they used a differing color, so prior to service note/photo same and hope these use a different product (I know, hope is not a strategy, better to watch them). btw: I use a different color brake fluid when I flush mine so I know when the old is completely purged.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I know that I think ATE had two colors, Blue and Orange, for this purpose, for their racing fluids, but then DOT had put them on notice due to violation of color coding. Supposedly the blue brake fluid was being removed from the vendors.
 

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Yes, I think I know the same. ;) But even "US DOT approved color" can be just enough different from brand to brand to assist in determining a complete flush. Fortunately I still have some fresh differing colors.
 

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You did not state the current milage and when was the last service was done. This info can help in answering your question on service A or B due. For example. Here is the history for my 2019 GLA put in service March 2019, March 2020 A, March 2021 B, and March 2022 A. I drive less than the 10k per year, so the service turns out yearly. I have a 2019 SLC put in service December 2018, December 2019 A, and now December 2020 B and December 2021 A. This one was a CPO purchased this past year.

On the brake fluid and other things, you have to trust the dealership. Mine does a short video of the tech under the car checking the brakes, the front-wheels movement for worn parts, and the undercarriage and sent it to me.

The A or B service is what we use to call an oil change, with B getting a brake fluid flush. MB then has a long list of items to service based on miles or age, which comes first, like tran fluid change, spark plugs, and other wear and tear items.
 

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IMO dealer service A & B are a scam and just another strike from the stealership.

You should look for the most reputable indi shop in the area and try to build a relationship with them. A good indi in your back pocket is IMO the best peace of mind to ensure preventative maintenance gets done on schedule while not getting clobbered over the head by the bills. My indi changes engine oil with Motul for 60% of what the dealer charges.

Here’s a dealer example…

Engine air filter is called for for every 10k miles in a 45, so technically every service it goes in for. Call up your dealer and ask how much it is for parts + labor for the filter, I bet it’s over $100 and close to $150. You can get genuine filters for about $40 bucks online, so every single time you’re sticking to your dealer A + B service you’re throwing them at least an extra $100 to undo four T25 screws, twist a filter 60 degrees, and hook the new one in.
Wiper blades are another up sell that gets ‘packaged’ in with A + B for another easy $100 grab.

So a final opinion is that A + B might be good for someone who’s never had their hood opened up and don’t know where the dipstick is, and Mercedes definitely knows there’s these type of people, but if you learn to be a partial lube tech for your filters and find a good indi you’re going to save a good chunk of money.
 

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There are tools that will measure the moisture content of your brake fluid. I consider 1% water OK but I flush if it gets higher. Unfortunately on the GLA master cylinder (at least on my model) I can't get to the fluid to test it. So routine flushing is the norm. Just be careful not to let the master go dry ... air in the system can affect the ABS and require a completely different bleed process.
 

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Dealerships are all not the same. There are those the rip you off and others who do not. One thing about using a dealer sometimes MB does what is called Service Campaigns. These are things that MB sees as a problem on their part and do the repair free of charge, or it might be a firmware update. Indy's do not do this, and if the problem happens charge you for the fix as they do not know of the service campaigns. My dealer does a free alignment check when I take it in. What indy does that? Yes, they can come to you with a list of things they want to do, but say no and either DIY or go to your indy.
 

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I ran into the service codes early in my ownership. On my 2017 45 I found reset options for A, B, D, E1, E2, G, etc (the letters may have been different but you get the idea). The dealer couldn't tell me what all of these extra choices were. I contacted the AMG Private Lounge and they didn't know. It was finally decided that the software engineers had a mind of their own and what they did was not transferred to any documentation outside of their department.

So, IMHO, the service letter is meaningless and it is nothing to obsess over. Use the service interval chart in the Owner's Manual to calculate what to do when. Cut the oil change interval in half (Used Oil Analysis indicates this is wise). The cabin filter interval can probably be doubled.

Anyway, when you buy a used car you start with the assumption nothing has been done (unless you have proof to the contrary) and do everything. Take a picture of the odometer for your records. File it in your GLA History Book with the receipts. Add the information into your table of services (include a column for next due to help you track things). And then put a post it note on the cover for date or miles to the next service.
 

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A few years back, MB had the alphabet for service and then changed to A & B with a separate list of items to service based on miles or age. These items were tied to one of the old letters based on miles and age. Unfortunately, some cars still showed the old way for unknown reasons—possibly the service tech, when updating, did the wrong update of the service letter. I had a 2007 MB, and when I took it in for service, it came back at different times with the new way and sometimes came back the old way. Finally, after a few years, it was always the new way.
 

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Around the turn of the current century Benz' reliability rating had slipped from its historic high. They analyzed and found that many folks weren't bothering with the recommended service intervals. So circa 2006 Benz instituted the in-warranty mandated A & B cycles and as a result reliability rating thereafter returned to a high level.
Some think this cycle is overkill and most consider them expensive but there was a reasoned rationale for this approach. Gotta protect many folks from themselves. Of course not we enthusiasts and hence ... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I agree with used cars assume nothing was done and use factory schedule but ignore exaggeratedly long oil change intervals. For mr I do all my work and do well with this.
But now I have to navigate the CPO situation.
od course I have an Indy that specializes in German cars. But he won’t be able to do free warranty work.

on the A and B, I still have questions:
Say the B includes air filter, cabin filter, wiper blades.
Say they quote me $250 for B.
I come in and in the parking lot check their work an take air filter out and find out it’s still old one (I could see the date or even put my signature on it)
They must replace the items called out to be replaced, regardless of their condition, no? And the price of all fluids and spare parts is included, right?

My car I bought certified at 11k miles. It had just been serviced. I thought that was an A service.
Now it’s at 19k miles.
I messaged the sales person at the dealership.
But his answer was that maybe the previous owner did a service before it was due. Makes no sense.
I will try to ask the service manager at the dealership where I bought it.
they were the interim owner between private owners and they serviced it.
 

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Yes, they should replace all items on the 'B' schedule of maintenance. Sometimes you have to remind/push them a bit, e.g. they sometimes forget wiper blade replacement. In my Audi one time they forgot to do the biennial brake fluid flush. 🤷‍♂️

Maybe the owner did a service? If it was done at Mercedes they certainly should have a record. But more than that if it's a Certified Pre-Owned there's a very specific and fairly wide ranging list of items to be done to be so certified, and again they should have a record of same. :unsure:
 

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From the MB USA site here is what they list for services A and B.
What is Service A?
With the first visit at approximately 10,000 miles or 1 year whichever comes first – and then approximately every 20,000 miles or 2 years after that - Service A includes:
  • Mercedes-Benz motor oil replacement
  • Oil filter replacement
  • Fluid level checks and corrections
  • Tire inflation check and correction
  • Brake component inspection
  • Reset maintenance counter
What is Service B?
With the first visit at approximately 20,000 miles or 1 year after the previous service - and then approximately every 20,000 miles or 2 years after that - Service B includes:
  • Mercedes-Benz motor oil replacement
  • Oil filter replacement
  • Fluid level checks and corrections
  • Tire inflation check and correction
  • Cabin dust/combination filter replacement
  • Brake component inspection
  • Brake fluid exchange
  • Reset maintenance counter

Some dealers tack on other items and will call to your attention based on miles or age other things that need attention. I will either let them do it or say no and make it a DIY or go to indy. All items done in the service by the dealer should have a breakdown of each item cost on the invoice. My dealer is good on prices such as oil and filters, other items have a high parts charge. Labor is a killer in the cost of service.

Here in the USA the history of the car, the dealer should have the ability to look at the service records that were done by any dealer as they are data records that are kept by MB network. They do have a problem giving you the records due to the names of owners being in them. My dealer did give them to me after making over the names and info. I have found CarFax is good but some local shops do not belong or report work and work done as DIY would be missing.

CPO there is a check-off list the dealer is supposed to use to CPO a car. I purchased an SLC in January 2021 that was a CPO. The dealer gave me a copy of the CPO inspection report. Attached is the report.
 

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