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Yes, I will admit this was amoung one of the most difficult repairs I have done. You are facing a $2,000.00 repair bill to replace the crankcase ventilation system. The part from a Mercedes dealer is over $900.00 and the flat rate labor is 5 hours but don't be suprised if the actual labor is north of 7 hours.
Just to highlight the repair procedure the following steps need to be followed:
  • The use of a car lift is definatley a requirement.
  • All the hoses and electrical connections need to be removed from the intake piece between the turbocharger and the air filter box.
  • The passenger wheel, axle nut, lower ball joint and axle retainer plate need to be removed.
  • Remove the axle assembly.
  • Remove the rear motor mount bracket and motor mount from side of engine. This is the most difficult part of the repair because the GLA250 is so crowded in that area and very hard to remove the 4 bolts holding the mount to the side of the engine.
  • The crankcase oil seperator which is part of the whole unit is mounted to the side of the engine under the motor mount.
  • While you have removed everything from the top of the engine I would suggest changing the spark plugs since they are readily accessable and easily renewed.
  • Use caution when feeding the new parts in between all the hoses and wires located on the backside of the engine. I must have raised and lowered my car hoist at least 20 times during the whole repair project.
Good luck if you decide to undertake this difficult repair. I did find the part online for around $600.00 plus shipping.
 

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My dealer wants about $850 for it, and 7 hours of labor at $300 per hour to swap it. That's for a 45.

It's not the cost of the job that keeps me awake, it's the popular internet notion that it is caused in the GLA not by the part going EOL, but rather overfilling oil that is puking into the separator and clogging the piping.

If that is true, then every dealer maintained car with a clogged PCV is caused by the people fishing for the repair.....

But no proof. To say nothing about never attributing malice where there is incompetence, which would be frankly worse (and equally unlikely)
 

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Early water cooled Porsches suffered damage to AOS systems whenever the oil was overfilled. This is not an uncommon problem, especially with oil expansion when hot.

In general I find it best to never let the oil level exceed the middle line. Dealers in general want to fill to full.
 

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Yes, I will admit this was amoung one of the most difficult repairs I have done. You are facing a $2,000.00 repair bill to replace the crankcase ventilation system. The part from a Mercedes dealer is over $900.00 and the flat rate labor is 5 hours but don't be suprised if the actual labor is north of 7 hours.
Just to highlight the repair procedure the following steps need to be followed:
  • The use of a car lift is definatley a requirement.
  • All the hoses and electrical connections need to be removed from the intake piece between the turbocharger and the air filter box.
  • The passenger wheel, axle nut, lower ball joint and axle retainer plate need to be removed.
  • Remove the axle assembly.
  • Remove the rear motor mount bracket and motor mount from side of engine. This is the most difficult part of the repair because the GLA250 is so crowded in that area and very hard to remove the 4 bolts holding the mount to the side of the engine.
  • The crankcase oil seperator which is part of the whole unit is mounted to the side of the engine under the motor mount.
  • While you have removed everything from the top of the engine I would suggest changing the spark plugs since they are readily accessable and easily renewed.
  • Use caution when feeding the new parts in between all the hoses and wires located on the backside of the engine. I must have raised and lowered my car hoist at least 20 times during the whole repair project.
Good luck if you decide to undertake this difficult repair. I did find the part online for around $600.00 plus shipping.
Currently in the process of changing this part on my 2017 W246 (non-electric, Canadian Spec)

Since this is not my daily driver, I took a stab at the repair myself. As Commodore stated, this a very difficult job. There's not much information out there for owners tackling this repair themselves, and not many user communities to encourage backyard mechanics to run to find support if you run into issues. Here's what I can offer.

Going through the dealer to purchase the part alone (in Canada) is over $1700.00 with our taxes. Your best bet is to find a reputable seller on eBay for an OEM replacement, or even try FCP Euro. Even with the exchange, duty, and the import charges - I'm shy under $800.00 CDN. The part number for my W246 is 2700900829. The replacement part for the W117, W176, and W246 is now A2700900700.

Here's a few things I also discovered with this repair. Unfortunately, I tackled this project in the driveway using jack-stands and large blocks of wood for added insurance. If you have a vehicle lift, you won't be crawling around as much. Lucky you! :cool:
  • Purchase an Inverted Torx socket set. You'll need a large E24 socket to take off the large axle nut. You also need an E14 socket to remove the 4 bolts holding the pendulum support mount
  • Be very cautious prying the lower ball joint. Again, find a good ball joint removal kit first before you start disassembly.
  • The lower torque mount is awkward to get out, take your time and spray a bit of WD40 to loosen up the mount from metal housing.
  • The pendulum support mount is VERY difficult to get to. Four (4) E14 inverted torx bolts holds this aluminum bracket in place. Be very careful removing these bolts as the edges round easily. If you found yourself rounding off a bolt, use a 11MM deep socket to help loosen the bolt. Once free, you should be able to loosen the bolt by hand. Replace and rounded bolts prior to re-assembly.
Before I crack open the box of the replacement part, I do want to try out a myth that the oil separator can be cleaned and put back into service. I'll follow-up my findings in a post over the next few days and confirm if this made any difference. As stated, my W246 is a 2017 model. Less than 50,000 kilometers on the ODO, and the part has already failed. I've always been a Volvo guy, and find working on older bricks much more easier. This repair will keep you on your toes, that's for sure!

05/25/22 Update: I've seen chatter on other MB forums that the GLC300 and the C300 share the same assembly. Found this topic on MB World and indeed, it's very similar. The updated part on the G/GLC 300 now deletes the diaphragm from the previous design.

I've tried cleaning the part with brake cleaner, and very little oil residue spilled out, so I'm not convinced gummy oil deposits are to blame. Will inspect the diaphragm to see if wear and tear is present.

05/26/22 Update: The oil separator I removed from my W246 (OEM PN# A2700104403) also appears to be used in the W205, C250, C300, C350, W166, W176, as well with other models sharing the 2.0L turbo such as the CLA and GLA250 platforms. Interesting... :unsure:

So, after searching online... I found that ECS tuning sells this part on it's website for $52.91 USD for an original OEM replacement. More interesting... :unsure:

The small part containing the sensor on my W246 (OEM PN# A0009976912) is what I think is contributing my CEL to throw a P052E error. Here's an owner of an W176 confirming his troubleshooting found on his YouTube channel with his A180

All the US MB dealers that have access to the online part stores (not available through Canadian dealers) do not list any of the individual part numbers that make up this whole assembly - which is why MB wants you to buy these overly priced kits. Great for them, terrible for the owners who just need the failed part.
  • A2700104403 - not available through MB directly, can be purchased from ECS Tuning and eBay.
  • A0009976912 - not available through MB directly, can be purchased on eBay (mostly from European sellers)
  • A2700180000 - not available through MB directly, can be purchased used on eBay
Given all this information I dug up, I don't need the inlet pipe to the Turbo - I just need the Oil Separator and the Actuator. Why am I spending $1700.00 CDN on a whole assembly when I can buy a similar kit for the C300 (again, these are all same individual parts that make assembly on my W246)

Moving forward, I'm purchasing the kit from FCP Euro that contains just what I need, and what I don't need and can discard (the Turbo Inlet pipe)

More updates shortly...

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All the US MB dealers that have access to the online part stores (not available through Canadian dealers) do not list any of the individual part numbers that make up this whole assembly - which is why MB wants you to buy these overly priced kits. Great for them, terrible for the owners who just need the failed part.
There’s actually a specific reason that these get sold as the full assembly and not as the individual parts. The connections to the oil separator are ‘one time use’ so you can’t break those connections and then frankenstein a new separator into the old assembly. Benz has been known for this type of ‘whole assembly replacement’ engineering and gets complaints about it often.
Facial expression Vertebrate Smile Mammal Rectangle





Given all this information I dug up, I don't need the inlet pipe to the Turbo - I just need the Oil Separator and the Actuator. Why am I spending $1700.00 CDN on a whole assembly when I can buy a similar kit for the C300 (again, these are all same individual parts that make assembly on my W246)

Moving forward, I'm purchasing the kit from FCP Euro that contains just what I need, and what I don't need and can discard (the Turbo Inlet pipe)
Be careful going this route due to what I said above about the one time use assembly. Quick story from my experience. I had this done on my 45 like a month ago and the whole assembly was on back order for a couple months prior. After lots of searching and researching I convinced myself I could source the parts myself, and have the dealer install them. Well, I bought the oil separator by itself and then it went into the dealer and the tech caught it before getting into the job that just the separator by itself wasn’t the right parts. It was a waiting game for the assembly to get back into stock and then got the repair done and now I have a $200 oil separator sitting in my garage (they sell it separately because EU spec 45’s (and maybe 250’s too?) can apparently remove the connection from the separator for some reason but US spec can’t)

Also, here is the WIS for the oil separator replacement on the M270 if you don’t have it already. https://f01.justanswer.com/73bbchev...ve_install_oil_separator_pcv_on_crankcase.pdf
 

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Yes, good point.

To confirm, The Oil Separator and the Actuator are attached together with a smaller bleed line that has a fixed, non-breakable end. However, the "pre-determined breaking point" (OEM PN# A2700105500) on the larger breather hose from the inlet pipe to the oil separator can be purchased individually to renew the seal from the inlet pipe and the oil separator.

On that note, the assembly from the C300 has the wrong inlet pipe for the M270/M274 motor, so I need to break that one-time use fitting to transplant the new parts on to my existing inlet pipe. Everything else on the C300 kit (minus the inlet pipe) is bolt-on ready.

As I wait for the kit to arrive from FCP Euro, I'm dabbling on the idea of creating my own one-time use seal at the inlet point- instead of using the $30 OEM part. I'm very **** bent to give MB any more money on this repair. :mad:

I was able to find a 7/8" rubber hose from my local Home Depot that seats beautifully at the two connection points on the old separator that I'm mocking up. To seal the hose to the two attaching points, you should be able to get by with marine-grade 1" heat-shrink tube to seal the rubber hose on the two mating surfaces.

So, I should have the new kit on Monday, and my version of the "one-time use seal" that I need is good to go.
 

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Here's an update for all you GLA/CLA/B-Class owners... the crankcase breather assembly from a C300 (OEM Part # A2740905600) directly bolts up to the M270 motor beautifully. Few things to point out from the assembly I removed my W246 with the M270, 2.0L Turbo.
  • The C300 version of the breather assembly, the circular diaphragm is deleted.
  • The breather line from the Inlet pipe to the Oil Separator is wrapped in a foam jacket (my guess is the plastic pipe became to brittle over time and MB addressed this as the better option)
  • The smaller bleeder line, and the larger breather line on the C300 assembly are not the same length as the assembly for the B/C/G-class models. Both lines are slightly longer, but not an issue as both lines can be manipulated slightly to accommodate the longer lengths.
  • MB and FCP Euro charges a core charge for this kit. There is no core charge for the OEM replacement for the B/C/G-class assembly
So, why did I install the breather assembly from the C300 and not the proper assembly for my exact model? Simple reason - price!

Like many of you who suffer from the dreaded P052E engine code - I was reluctant to have my local MB dealer service my W246. The dealer quoted me $4700.00 (Canadian) for the repair - or roughly $3700.00 in US funds to replace (in my mind) a defective part.

As of May 2022, with current pricing of auto parts in Canada (now higher due to inflation) the OEM replacement part for my W246 is a whopping $1531.00... add 13% for Federal and Provincial taxes, this now becomes $1731.12 for JUST the part alone.

So, what are my options... well, there's no cheap option for Canadians in this story. It all boils down on how much are YOU willing to do to help offset the cost of the repair. Here were my original considerations.
  • Let the dealer complete the repair, and move on with life with almost $5000.00 less in my pocket
  • Cross the border, and drive to a local MB dealership in Buffalo, New York and have them complete the repair -or- buy the part, and bring it back into Canada
  • Buy the correct OEM assembly from a US online retailer, and have it shipped directly to Canada and replace the item myself
  • Purchase a used kit from eBay, and hope the issue doesn't reappear
Option 2 seemed like a good choice, but the W246 is not available in the US as a gasoline model - only electric. Could the technician still perform the repair regardless of an unfamiliar Mercedes model... likely, but not something I was willing to chance on. The cost for the same repair on the GLA at the dealership in Buffalo is about $2875.00 US. With currency exchange, that puts me at around $3600.00 Canadian. Now, to buy the OEM part directly (in person) at the dealer in Buffalo was $712.00 - to buy the part online (at the same dealer) was $538.00. This still puts me over $1000.00 for this part when factor in the costs of bringing over auto parts into Canada from the US.

Having removed the previous assembly (leaving the air inlet intact) from my B-class, I decided that the best option was to "gamble" the purchases on the kit for the C300. The defect that causes the P052E does not relate to the inlet pipe, just the Oil Separator and the Actuator - and those parts are identical on the C300 so why does Mercedes include the inlet pipe? No idea... other than price gouging is my guess.

Conclusion.
  • Installation and re-assembly was easy and straightforward - basically the reverse order of disassembly.
  • Can you perform this repair without removing the wheel, axle shaft and pendulum shaft and various heat shields - absolutely not... this all needs to removed before you can even access the separator and actuator.
  • Can this repair be completed at home, or in a garage on jack stands? Yes, but with added difficulty. Everything in the motor compartment is tight, tight, tight. Once you become familiar with what needs to be removed, it is something the average "joe" can repair.
  • How much time do you need to complete this repair - about 5-6 hours. More if your taking your time, or if this is your first Mercedes vehicle that your repairing (like me)
  • Cost on parts came out to $664.00 Canadian plus a $65.00 core charge at the dealer - so just a bit over $700.00 Canadian (or roughly $550.00 USD)
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Currently in the process of changing this part on my 2017 W246 (non-electric, Canadian Spec)

Since this is not my daily driver, I took a stab at the repair myself. As Commodore stated, this a very difficult job. There's not much information out there for owners tackling this repair themselves, and not many user communities to encourage backyard mechanics to run to find support if you run into issues. Here's what I can offer.

Going through the dealer to purchase the part alone (in Canada) is over $1700.00 with our taxes. Your best bet is to find a reputable seller on eBay for an OEM replacement, or even try FCP Euro. Even with the exchange, duty, and the import charges - I'm shy under $800.00 CDN. The part number for my W246 is 2700900829. The replacement part for the W117, W176, and W246 is now A2700900700.

Here's a few things I also discovered with this repair. Unfortunately, I tackled this project in the driveway using jack-stands and large blocks of wood for added insurance. If you have a vehicle lift, you won't be crawling around as much. Lucky you! :cool:
  • Purchase an Inverted Torx socket set. You'll need a large E24 socket to take off the large axle nut. You also need an E14 socket to remove the 4 bolts holding the pendulum support mount
  • Be very cautious prying the lower ball joint. Again, find a good ball joint removal kit first before you start disassembly.
  • The lower torque mount is awkward to get out, take your time and spray a bit of WD40 to loosen up the mount from metal housing.
  • The pendulum support mount is VERY difficult to get to. Four (4) E14 inverted torx bolts holds this aluminum bracket in place. Be very careful removing these bolts as the edges round easily. If you found yourself rounding off a bolt, use a 11MM deep socket to help loosen the bolt. Once free, you should be able to loosen the bolt by hand. Replace and rounded bolts prior to re-assembly.
Before I crack open the box of the replacement part, I do want to try out a myth that the oil separator can be cleaned and put back into service. I'll follow-up my findings in a post over the next few days and confirm if this made any difference. As stated, my W246 is a 2017 model. Less than 50,000 kilometers on the ODO, and the part has already failed. I've always been a Volvo guy, and find working on older bricks much more easier. This repair will keep you on your toes, that's for sure!

05/25/22 Update: I've seen chatter on other MB forums that the GLC300 and the C300 share the same assembly. Found this topic on MB World and indeed, it's very similar. The updated part on the G/GLC 300 now deletes the diaphragm from the previous design.

I've tried cleaning the part with brake cleaner, and very little oil residue spilled out, so I'm not convinced gummy oil deposits are to blame. Will inspect the diaphragm to see if wear and tear is present.

05/26/22 Update: The oil separator I removed from my W246 (OEM PN# A2700104403) also appears to be used in the W205, C250, C300, C350, W166, W176, as well with other models sharing the 2.0L turbo such as the CLA and GLA250 platforms. Interesting... :unsure:

So, after searching online... I found that ECS tuning sells this part on it's website for $52.91 USD for an original OEM replacement. More interesting... :unsure:

The small part containing the sensor on my W246 (OEM PN# A0009976912) is what I think is contributing my CEL to throw a P052E error. Here's an owner of an W176 confirming his troubleshooting found on his YouTube channel with his A180

All the US MB dealers that have access to the online part stores (not available through Canadian dealers) do not list any of the individual part numbers that make up this whole assembly - which is why MB wants you to buy these overly priced kits. Great for them, terrible for the owners who just need the failed part.
  • A2700104403 - not available through MB directly, can be purchased from ECS Tuning and eBay.
  • A0009976912 - not available through MB directly, can be purchased on eBay (mostly from European sellers)
  • A2700180000 - not available through MB directly, can be purchased used on eBay
Given all this information I dug up, I don't need the inlet pipe to the Turbo - I just need the Oil Separator and the Actuator. Why am I spending $1700.00 CDN on a whole assembly when I can buy a similar kit for the C300 (again, these are all same individual parts that make assembly on my W246)

Moving forward, I'm purchasing the kit from FCP Euro that contains just what I need, and what I don't need and can discard (the Turbo Inlet pipe)

More updates shortly...

View attachment 27672 View attachment 27671 View attachment 27673
Here's an update for all you GLA/CLA/B-Class owners... the crankcase breather assembly from a C300 (OEM Part # A2740905600) directly bolts up to the M270 motor beautifully. Few things to point out from the assembly I removed my W246 with the M270, 2.0L Turbo.
  • The C300 version of the breather assembly, the circular diaphragm is deleted.
  • The breather line from the Inlet pipe to the Oil Separator is wrapped in a foam jacket (my guess is the plastic pipe became to brittle over time and MB addressed this as the better option)
  • The smaller bleeder line, and the larger breather line on the C300 assembly are not the same length as the assembly for the B/C/G-class models. Both lines are slightly longer, but not an issue as both lines can be manipulated slightly to accommodate the longer lengths.
  • MB and FCP Euro charges a core charge for this kit. There is no core charge for the OEM replacement for the B/C/G-class assembly
So, why did I install the breather assembly from the C300 and not the proper assembly for my exact model? Simple reason - price!

Like many of you who suffer from the dreaded P052E engine code - I was reluctant to have my local MB dealer service my W246. The dealer quoted me $4700.00 (Canadian) for the repair - or roughly $3700.00 in US funds to replace (in my mind) a defective part.

As of May 2022, with current pricing of auto parts in Canada (now higher due to inflation) the OEM replacement part for my W246 is a whopping $1531.00... add 13% for Federal and Provincial taxes, this now becomes $1731.12 for JUST the part alone.

So, what are my options... well, there's no cheap option for Canadians in this story. It all boils down on how much are YOU willing to do to help offset the cost of the repair. Here were my original considerations.
  • Let the dealer complete the repair, and move on with life with almost $5000.00 less in my pocket
  • Cross the border, and drive to a local MB dealership in Buffalo, New York and have them complete the repair -or- buy the part, and bring it back into Canada
  • Buy the correct OEM assembly from a US online retailer, and have it shipped directly to Canada and replace the item myself
  • Purchase a used kit from eBay, and hope the issue doesn't reappear
Option 2 seemed like a good choice, but the W246 is not available in the US as a gasoline model - only electric. Could the technician still perform the repair regardless of an unfamiliar Mercedes model... likely, but not something I was willing to chance on. The cost for the same repair on the GLA at the dealership in Buffalo is about $2875.00 US. With currency exchange, that puts me at around $3600.00 Canadian. Now, to buy the OEM part directly (in person) at the dealer in Buffalo was $712.00 - to buy the part online (at the same dealer) was $538.00. This still puts me over $1000.00 for this part when factor in the costs of bringing over auto parts into Canada from the US.

Having removed the previous assembly (leaving the air inlet intact) from my B-class, I decided that the best option was to "gamble" the purchases on the kit for the C300. The defect that causes the P052E does not relate to the inlet pipe, just the Oil Separator and the Actuator - and those parts are identical on the C300 so why does Mercedes include the inlet pipe? No idea... other than price gouging is my guess.

Conclusion.
  • Installation and re-assembly was easy and straightforward - basically the reverse order of disassembly.
  • Can you perform this repair without removing the wheel, axle shaft and pendulum shaft and various heat shields - absolutely not... this all needs to removed before you can even access the separator and actuator.
  • Can this repair be completed at home, or in a garage on jack stands? Yes, but with added difficulty. Everything in the motor compartment is tight, tight, tight. Once you become familiar with what needs to be removed, it is something the average "joe" can repair.
  • How much time do you need to complete this repair - about 5-6 hours. More if your taking your time, or if this is your first Mercedes vehicle that your repairing (like me)
  • Cost on parts came out to $664.00 Canadian plus a $65.00 core charge at the dealer - so just a bit over $700.00 Canadian (or roughly $550.00 USD)
View attachment 27695 View attachment 27697 View attachment 27698 View attachment 27699 View attachment 27700
Having the same issues is it possible to contact you? I have more than a few questions.
Regards
 

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Here's an update for all you GLA/CLA/B-Class owners... the crankcase breather assembly from a C300 (OEM Part # A2740905600) directly bolts up to the M270 motor beautifully. Few things to point out from the assembly I removed my W246 with the M270, 2.0L Turbo.
  • The C300 version of the breather assembly, the circular diaphragm is deleted.
  • The breather line from the Inlet pipe to the Oil Separator is wrapped in a foam jacket (my guess is the plastic pipe became to brittle over time and MB addressed this as the better option)
  • The smaller bleeder line, and the larger breather line on the C300 assembly are not the same length as the assembly for the B/C/G-class models. Both lines are slightly longer, but not an issue as both lines can be manipulated slightly to accommodate the longer lengths.
  • MB and FCP Euro charges a core charge for this kit. There is no core charge for the OEM replacement for the B/C/G-class assembly
So, why did I install the breather assembly from the C300 and not the proper assembly for my exact model? Simple reason - price!

Like many of you who suffer from the dreaded P052E engine code - I was reluctant to have my local MB dealer service my W246. The dealer quoted me $4700.00 (Canadian) for the repair - or roughly $3700.00 in US funds to replace (in my mind) a defective part.

As of May 2022, with current pricing of auto parts in Canada (now higher due to inflation) the OEM replacement part for my W246 is a whopping $1531.00... add 13% for Federal and Provincial taxes, this now becomes $1731.12 for JUST the part alone.

So, what are my options... well, there's no cheap option for Canadians in this story. It all boils down on how much are YOU willing to do to help offset the cost of the repair. Here were my original considerations.
  • Let the dealer complete the repair, and move on with life with almost $5000.00 less in my pocket
  • Cross the border, and drive to a local MB dealership in Buffalo, New York and have them complete the repair -or- buy the part, and bring it back into Canada
  • Buy the correct OEM assembly from a US online retailer, and have it shipped directly to Canada and replace the item myself
  • Purchase a used kit from eBay, and hope the issue doesn't reappear
Option 2 seemed like a good choice, but the W246 is not available in the US as a gasoline model - only electric. Could the technician still perform the repair regardless of an unfamiliar Mercedes model... likely, but not something I was willing to chance on. The cost for the same repair on the GLA at the dealership in Buffalo is about $2875.00 US. With currency exchange, that puts me at around $3600.00 Canadian. Now, to buy the OEM part directly (in person) at the dealer in Buffalo was $712.00 - to buy the part online (at the same dealer) was $538.00. This still puts me over $1000.00 for this part when factor in the costs of bringing over auto parts into Canada from the US.

Having removed the previous assembly (leaving the air inlet intact) from my B-class, I decided that the best option was to "gamble" the purchases on the kit for the C300. The defect that causes the P052E does not relate to the inlet pipe, just the Oil Separator and the Actuator - and those parts are identical on the C300 so why does Mercedes include the inlet pipe? No idea... other than price gouging is my guess.

Conclusion.
  • Installation and re-assembly was easy and straightforward - basically the reverse order of disassembly.
  • Can you perform this repair without removing the wheel, axle shaft and pendulum shaft and various heat shields - absolutely not... this all needs to removed before you can even access the separator and actuator.
  • Can this repair be completed at home, or in a garage on jack stands? Yes, but with added difficulty. Everything in the motor compartment is tight, tight, tight. Once you become familiar with what needs to be removed, it is something the average "joe" can repair.
  • How much time do you need to complete this repair - about 5-6 hours. More if your taking your time, or if this is your first Mercedes vehicle that your repairing (like me)
  • Cost on parts came out to $664.00 Canadian plus a $65.00 core charge at the dealer - so just a bit over $700.00 Canadian (or roughly $550.00 USD)
View attachment 27695 View attachment 27697 View attachment 27698 View attachment 27699 View attachment 27700
Here's an update for all you GLA/CLA/B-Class owners... the crankcase breather assembly from a C300 (OEM Part # A2740905600) directly bolts up to the M270 motor beautifully. Few things to point out from the assembly I removed my W246 with the M270, 2.0L Turbo.
  • The C300 version of the breather assembly, the circular diaphragm is deleted.
  • The breather line from the Inlet pipe to the Oil Separator is wrapped in a foam jacket (my guess is the plastic pipe became to brittle over time and MB addressed this as the better option)
  • The smaller bleeder line, and the larger breather line on the C300 assembly are not the same length as the assembly for the B/C/G-class models. Both lines are slightly longer, but not an issue as both lines can be manipulated slightly to accommodate the longer lengths.
  • MB and FCP Euro charges a core charge for this kit. There is no core charge for the OEM replacement for the B/C/G-class assembly
So, why did I install the breather assembly from the C300 and not the proper assembly for my exact model? Simple reason - price!

Like many of you who suffer from the dreaded P052E engine code - I was reluctant to have my local MB dealer service my W246. The dealer quoted me $4700.00 (Canadian) for the repair - or roughly $3700.00 in US funds to replace (in my mind) a defective part.

As of May 2022, with current pricing of auto parts in Canada (now higher due to inflation) the OEM replacement part for my W246 is a whopping $1531.00... add 13% for Federal and Provincial taxes, this now becomes $1731.12 for JUST the part alone.

So, what are my options... well, there's no cheap option for Canadians in this story. It all boils down on how much are YOU willing to do to help offset the cost of the repair. Here were my original considerations.
  • Let the dealer complete the repair, and move on with life with almost $5000.00 less in my pocket
  • Cross the border, and drive to a local MB dealership in Buffalo, New York and have them complete the repair -or- buy the part, and bring it back into Canada
  • Buy the correct OEM assembly from a US online retailer, and have it shipped directly to Canada and replace the item myself
  • Purchase a used kit from eBay, and hope the issue doesn't reappear
Option 2 seemed like a good choice, but the W246 is not available in the US as a gasoline model - only electric. Could the technician still perform the repair regardless of an unfamiliar Mercedes model... likely, but not something I was willing to chance on. The cost for the same repair on the GLA at the dealership in Buffalo is about $2875.00 US. With currency exchange, that puts me at around $3600.00 Canadian. Now, to buy the OEM part directly (in person) at the dealer in Buffalo was $712.00 - to buy the part online (at the same dealer) was $538.00. This still puts me over $1000.00 for this part when factor in the costs of bringing over auto parts into Canada from the US.

Having removed the previous assembly (leaving the air inlet intact) from my B-class, I decided that the best option was to "gamble" the purchases on the kit for the C300. The defect that causes the P052E does not relate to the inlet pipe, just the Oil Separator and the Actuator - and those parts are identical on the C300 so why does Mercedes include the inlet pipe? No idea... other than price gouging is my guess.

Conclusion.
  • Installation and re-assembly was easy and straightforward - basically the reverse order of disassembly.
  • Can you perform this repair without removing the wheel, axle shaft and pendulum shaft and various heat shields - absolutely not... this all needs to removed before you can even access the separator and actuator.
  • Can this repair be completed at home, or in a garage on jack stands? Yes, but with added difficulty. Everything in the motor compartment is tight, tight, tight. Once you become familiar with what needs to be removed, it is something the average "joe" can repair.
  • How much time do you need to complete this repair - about 5-6 hours. More if your taking your time, or if this is your first Mercedes vehicle that your repairing (like me)
  • Cost on parts came out to $664.00 Canadian plus a $65.00 core charge at the dealer - so just a bit over $700.00 Canadian (or roughly $550.00 USD)
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Very helpful thread guys - thanks to all the contributors

I too have a Canadian B250 (2014 model year) and have this P052E71 code. I'm reasonable handy with car repairs and am thinking about tackling this one on my own - I have a lift and most the tools. So my question is whether its necessary to buy the entire kit from FCP Euro or can I get away with purchasing just the Oil Separator (PN A2700104403) part plus a new connector (PN A2700105500) and actuator (PN A0009976912) instead ?
 

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Very helpful thread guys - thanks to all the contributors

I too have a Canadian B250 (2014 model year) and have this P052E71 code. I'm reasonable handy with car repairs and am thinking about tackling this one on my own - I have a lift and most the tools. So my question is whether its necessary to buy the entire kit from FCP Euro or can I get away with purchasing just the Oil Separator (PN A2700104403) part plus a new connector (PN A2700105500) and actuator (PN A0009976912) instead ?
That’s a good question - and something I thought a few weeks later after I made the repairs on my B250.

Mercedes Benz has made several revisions on this PCV assembly for the M270/M274 motors over the years. So, with all the kits that are out there sitting on warehouse shelves, are you buying a kit on newer old stock using some of the older problematic individual parts that make up the new kit?

To this day, the part I used from the C300 model has worked great with no issue I can report of. Yes, it wasn’t initially intended for the B250, but it functions as if it was. I was also a bit skeptical that the small circular diaphragm not present on the newer revision for the C300. As of September 8th, 2022… my B250 is happily purring away with out it and with no CEL present.

My best advice to you, take your time… soak all the nuts and bolts with penetrating spray a head of time. Be very careful on how much torque you apply to break the bolts free, and most importantly, be very vigilant removing the passenger axle from the bell housing. Since you need to loosen and drop the spindle - the ball joint on the lower control arms are NOT serviceable. So, If you tear into the rubber sleeve by accident… your likely buying a new LCA.

Good luck, and keep us posted!
 
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