Mercedes-Benz GLA Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, due to giving my daughter my current car, I need to buy a new car faster then planned. I want to stay on a budget so I searched used / demo GLA. I found one at a good price with the options I want but it's not the all wheel drive. The price is right and I love the car but been driving all wheel drive vehicles for awhile. I am located in Maryland and we do get some bad weather. Of course, I am sure there are more people in Maryland driving front wheel drive cars then all wheel drive but I wanted to hear from some front wheel drive GLA owners out there to see how they do in bad weather. From what I read, even the all wheel drive cars use front wheel only during normal driving so it's not like an Audi all time all wheel drive. Any thoughts? Thanks, Frank
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,407 Posts
Welcome Frank! I'm pretty pleased with my front wheel drive 2016 GLA250, but I don't go off road nor have to contend with too much ice on Oahu. That said, I had a Jaguar X-Type AWD and found the extra mechanics to make that work were problematic...the most onerous issue being an out-of-balance drive shaft that produced persistent vibration at 55 MPH. It took about five service visits to figure that out...the final one kept the car over two weeks. I would agree there are advantages to AWD, especially in adverse weather. You'll see lots of praise for it here and I'm sure others will chime in with positive endorsements. But for me, FWD works fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
I know you want front wheel info, but I drop the 4matics detail so you see the difference.

The 4matic does not recommend you use off road mode on snow and ice, but everything else is good. Off-road mode is a separate included option for 4matic GLAs.

The mechanical principle of the 4MATIC system is based on a 45:55 torque split between the front and rear axles and a multi-disc limited-slip centre differential with a basic locking torque of 50 Nm, enabling high levels of traction. First, the dynamic shift in axle load toward the rear axle that occurs during acceleration is harnessed to deliver more drive torque to the rear wheels. Second, the multi-disc differential lock is also able to shift the drive torque between the front and rear axles, varying the split between 30:70 and 70:30 as the road conditions dictate.

Rest of article. Mercedes-Benz 4MATIC Explained
 
  • Like
Reactions: turbolink

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
I had a 2 wheel drive CLA. Not the same car but very similar in terms of the drive train mechanics. It was fabulous in the rain and snow. I really didn't need the 4matic and I went through a lot of snow last year when I had the car. I used all seasons tires and did not feel the need to get snows.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
I've got the 2WD GLA250, but despite going up to Big Bear skiing, don't need it here in sunny southern california (was 85ºF here yesterday!). One BIG THING to remember about AWD cars from any manufacturer: If you get an un-repairable flat tire with say 10k miles on them (sidewall damage, etc.), you have to replace ALL 4 TIRES, as the circumference of the tires is now smaller because of wear. If you do not replace them all in that situation, the transfer case will wear out because the computer will be trying to correct for what it sees as a slipping tire(s).

If you're rich no problem. 4 new tires and your good!
 
  • Like
Reactions: turbolink

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
Anecdotal of course, but... I used to live high up in the Sierras where we'd get over 30 feet of snow piled up every winter. Driving in snow was, well, regular driving for half the year. My roommates and friends would get their Subarus and 4x4 trucks stuck all the time. I never got stuck once. My car? 1993 Honda Civic. The key? Good tires. I had snow tires for winter and some ridiculous low profile chrome rims for summer.
All things being equal the AWD will do better in snow, especially getting going or getting up a slick hill, but as long as your tires are good you shouldn't have any problems unless you're looking to get into the snow plowing business with your FWD GLA.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,407 Posts
Anecdotal of course, but... I used to live high up in the Sierras where we'd get over 30 feet of snow piled up every winter. Driving in snow was, well, regular driving for half the year. My roommates and friends would get their Subarus and 4x4 trucks stuck all the time. I never got stuck once. My car? 1993 Honda Civic. The key? Good tires. I had snow tires for winter and some ridiculous low profile chrome rims for summer.
All things being equal the AWD will do better in snow, especially getting going or getting up a slick hill, but as long as your tires are good you shouldn't have any problems unless you're looking to get into the snow plowing business with your FWD GLA.
Living in Northern VA in the 1990s we had a 92 Honda Accord and a 92 Civic. When the heavy snows came, the Civic ran like a champ through it all when others bogged down. That's amazing. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
880 Posts
Drove through new england during my college days with a 90s civic, no probs at all, you just have to know your limits and try not to tackle them snow mountains
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Decided to get the AWD

Thanks everyone for the info. The used GLA that I posted about was front wheel drive and after test driving it, I decide not to buy it due to I wanted additional options so I looked at new GLA last night and decided to buy a new AWD one. The dealer did not have the color combo I wanted so they are getting one brought in from another dealer and I pick it up tomorrow. Thanks again, Frank
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
We lease a FWD GLA. Frankly I would have preferred the 4Matic, but we got a good deal on this showroom car - perhaps in part because of the unusual color (Universe Blue), which I love and is no longer offered. I have had an interesting experience and wonder if any others noticed the same thing. I have driven three GLAs: my test drive of a 4Matic dealer car before leasing, our own FWD, and a dealer loaner 4Matic for two days recently when we had a tire puncture on our car. I have no official figures of any kind to back this up, but my feel of the different cars was that the FWD model seemed less sludgy off the line than the 4Matic and sportier to drive in terms of steering feel. Saving $2,000 in upfront cost, getting better gas mileage, and having a car that is more fun to drive make the FWD version the better buy in my mind. However, the 4Matic obviously would seem to make sense in a snowy climate - and perhaps for resale value if you live anywhere where most buyers would want the 4 Matic. Again, I would love the hear if anyone else shares or would dispute my experience here as it's just a seat of the pants notion on my part.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
My last few cars have been AWD, but my 2015 GLA is FWD. It was the last 2015 in stock, and it had panoramic roof and HK sound. I looked at a couple of 2016 4Matics, but ended up with the 2015, because of the added expense. Due to the strange winter in the NE USA, I can't give a real accurate idea of how it works in the snow, since we haven't had any snow. I opted for the FWD because I had FWD Chrysler Sebrings a few cars back, and the FWD worked very well in the snow. FWD definitely wants to oversteer, but you get used to it. I like the 2 MPG better gas mileage and the lowered drive train complexity. I was listening to the Mormon Tabernacle choir the other day whilst on the road, and decided I'd much rather have the great sound than the AWD. Different strokes, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
236 Posts
The GLA250SUV is a very capable FWD vehicle, for on road driving it can go over snow covered roads without any difficulties, once the DSC is turned off it can negotiate any snow covered road without traction loss. I understand FWD has its limitations. Of course you will not be able to do any serious off road driving or really deep snow or mud. The GLA 250SUV behaves like any FWD Nissans, I have driven my Lexus CT200H with DSC disengaged and was able to traverse six inches of snow covered roads back in NJ. The FWD transmission in general is superior on icy roads, much less slippage and fishtailing than any AWD's. My best ever snow car was a RWD 504 Peugeot Diesel, it went through deep snow like a tractor. Of course 18" high profile tires will get better traction than 19" or 20" low profile tires. For every day driving, it is less prone to hydroplaning, don't forget MB yaw control for lateral stability is second to none.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
Thanks for the input. I have now driven it for almost exactly a year, through rain and sleet and snow, and it does quite well. I have not found it necessary to disconnect the traction control, but we didn't have much of a winter last year, and haven't had much of a winter yet this year.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top