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My wife acquired a new 2020 GLA250 in black. We understand black is a high maintenance color but we're noticing some small bubbles that are blueish in color throughput the hood & front quarter panels. It seem to be between the paint & clear coating? This picture below has a US dime in it for reference. There is also significant "orange peeling if the paint. Has anyone else had such issues?
20201006_074841.jpg

26100
 

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Black is not a color. It is a hobby.

Pam insisted on black when we ordered her 2017 45. I figured since I was preparing to retire ...

And regardless of effort we have some of the same spotting. The car mostly sits outside, under a tree. I blame pitch eating into the clear coat but that's merely supposition. I look forward to those more knowledgeable supplying a solution.
 

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Looks like a visit to the dealer and see what they offer. Clear coats are good but tree sap, bird poop, and some other thing can damage clear coats. My black cars after washing get either a spray wax or a detail spray between several spray waxes. The new ceramic sprays are looking good for clear seal and paint protection going forward. GLA is a small SUV and sprays are easy and fast to do.
 

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Yes, as Wayne says black is a hobby. So in that spirit I would suggest you do the full wash, clay bar, and medium-polish to ascertain if it is something on the paint or a problem within the paint. Even after a good sudsy hand wash it's disconcerting how much can remain on the paint, but a clay bar and polish sequence typically removes it. A good test after clay bar'g is to cover your hand in some kitchen wrap and then run it over the finish. btw: I used to use actual clay but now use a synthetic pad (Griot's, Mothers, etc). You can even do the clay'g while finish washing. Either way just remember to work in small areas and keep the clay/synthetic lubricated with wash soap or detailing spray.

If the bluish spots remain after this pre-wax detailing effort then alas something has eaten into the paint. At this point you might consider a more aggressive polish or compound step to see if it's in the outer layer of clear coat. I like Griot's "Complete Polish." They also have a "Complete Compound" but I've not had to go that more aggressive step. The watchword is to always first go least aggressive and then only work up to more aggressive if needed.

"Orange peel" is another matter. Typically Germanic paint jobs are some of the best but this phenomenon can still happen. A good polish usually resolves same as it is only in the uppermost layer of clear. I used Complete Polish on our GLA soon after delivery as it had sat on the dealer's lot for a couple months. Most dealerships sub-out bodyshop/paint work so unless you feel this is a warranty issue and want them to see it in its present state I wouldn't bother with them.

What is your GLA's parked environment? Tree types? Wildfire fallout? Birds? Urban acid rain? We once parked near the airport and there was some construction fallout on our hood. There are a lot of paint-detrimental conditions in the environment. "Let's be careful out there." -Hill St. Blues

btw: I typically wash with Griot's car soap but if I know I'm going to do a complete detailing with a final wax/sealant then once or twice a year I'll use Dawn dishwashing detergent instead. It completely strips off any old wax, etc. and assures me I am addressing another variable.

All the best and if this detailing is not your thing then seek out a professional shop in your area. It's amazing what they can do.
 

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I agree with the above but, FWIW, I recently read that Dawn over time can cause problems with the clear coat and that you should use a decon (decontamination) soap specifically designed for car finishes instead. Then again this may have been advertising hype. Dawn has been the go to dewaxer for years and I haven't heard complaints.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yes, as Wayne says black is a hobby. So in that spirit I would suggest you do the full wash, clay bar, and medium-polish to ascertain if it is something on the paint or a problem within the paint. Even after a good sudsy hand wash it's disconcerting how much can remain on the paint, but a clay bar and polish sequence typically removes it. A good test after clay bar'g is to cover your hand in some kitchen wrap and then run it over the finish. btw: I used to use actual clay but now use a synthetic pad (Griot's, Mothers, etc). You can even do the clay'g while finish washing. Either way just remember to work in small areas and keep the clay/synthetic lubricated with wash soap or detailing spray.

If the bluish spots remain after this pre-wax detailing effort then alas something has eaten into the paint. At this point you might consider a more aggressive polish or compound step to see if it's in the outer layer of clear coat. I like Griot's "Complete Polish." They also have a "Complete Compound" but I've not had to go that more aggressive step. The watchword is to always first go least aggressive and then only work up to more aggressive if needed.

"Orange peel" is another matter. Typically Germanic paint jobs are some of the best but this phenomenon can still happen. A good polish usually resolves same as it is only in the uppermost layer of clear. I used Complete Polish on our GLA soon after delivery as it had sat on the dealer's lot for a couple months. Most dealerships sub-out bodyshop/paint work so unless you feel this is a warranty issue and want them to see it in its present state I wouldn't bother with them.

What is your GLA's parked environment? Tree types? Wildfire fallout? Birds? Urban acid rain? We once parked near the airport and there was some construction fallout on our hood. There are a lot of paint-detrimental conditions in the environment. "Let's be careful out there." -Hill St. Blues

btw: I typically wash with Griot's car soap but if I know I'm going to do a complete detailing with a final wax/sealant then once or twice a year I'll use Dawn dishwashing detergent instead. It completely strips off any old wax, etc. and assures me I am addressing another variable.

All the best and if this detailing is not your thing then seek out a professional shop in your area. It's amazing what they can do.
Thank you & we appreciate the feedback and info.
A few details. Parked outdoors, no birds or critter droppings. Live in an arid, hot desert climate with very little rain. Used to UV protection car cover a lot if the car is clean. Microfiber cloth wipe downs frequently.

The car has less than 2700 miles on it. Washed & polished it this past weekend but the spots were there long before that.

Our 1st actionable thought is to take it to the dealership & have them evaluate it. I recently had my 2019 Toyota Tundra ceramic coated & am very happy with that.(yes that requires monthly cleaning maintenance)

Owning a black vehicle is somewhat of a Love-Hate relationship...
 

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One of my favourites is Autoglym rapid aqua wax. After washing the car, leave wet, spray on rapid aqua wax and buff to a shine with a good quality cloth (you get 2 when you buy the aqua wax). I've used it every wash for a couple of years now, very easy to apply.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Here is an update with my wife's 2020 Black GLA 250. I stopped in at our local dealer without an appointment & they made me make an appointment for the next day. so I did. Then l went by a local collision/paint & body shop and talked with a gentleman who worked in the industry for 30+ years. He nailed it ! He called it "Rail Dust & Rail Rust". What that is is microscopic fragments of metal that get on vehicles in their transportation on trains and or sit in lots near industrial areas waiting for delivery to Auto dealerships. These particles of metal then get on the vehicle and with moisture of any type the metal gets into the cars clear coating and eventually starts to rust or bubble in the clear coat.

When I went back to the dealer they had never heard of Rail Dust/Rust but didn't rule out its possibility. While they were looking at my car I went walking through the new car lot looking specifically at the black cars. I found a $108,000 2020 S 560 Sedan with the same issues. I mentioned that to a service rep & he didn't seem the least bit interested (for what that's worth I guess?) I was then sent to their collision center and one of their long time, old paint & body specialists confirmed that it was indeed Rail Dust/Rust. They played around with 1 spot & was able to get it out. Their recommendation is a thorough clay bar, compound ru, polish treatment. So now its back to the dealer to see who will cover the costs of the work?

A footnote. I was also told by an old longtime professional that the spots will return regardless of what actions are taken with the clay bar, compounds & polishes, it will be a continual headache....

Hope this helps
I'm awaiting the dealerships decision....
 

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Thanks also for the feedback. However I'm puzzled by the comment that it might return. After a thorough clean/polish/seal it would seem the offending ferrous particles would no longer be on/in the top layer of clear and therefore no longer an issue?
btw: hydrated magnetite Fe3O4.H2O is bluish-green in color when it rusts, in case you were interested in the actual mineral apparently responsible.
Again case in point for why I did a clay/polish on my [even tho' white] GLA soon after delivery due to it sitting on a lot [even tho' mostly in cleaner air Maine] for a couple months.
Related: I no longer let dealerships wash my car(s) after service as it creates more issues than it solves (hard water mineral water spots, drying swirls, etc.). So I'm not surprised by your salesperson's disinterest. They just want to get units off the lot.
 
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