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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
I am a new 2015 GLA250 owner, could some one show me where the oil drain plug and oil filer are? I try to change the oil at home.

Thanks,
 

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See the attached picture ... oil filter canister is circled in yellow. It is located at the rear of the engine compartment on the left side as you face the front of the car.

The oil drain plug is accessed by removing the plastic skid plate (what a contradiction in terms) that is mounted underneath the engine. It may be easier, quicker and less messy to invest in a suction pump to evacuate the oil through the dip stick tube. If you do that you will not have to get a drain plug crush washer every time you change the oil but evacuation *may* leave more oil in the crankcase than draining though. There is a YouTube video of someone sucking the oil out of a CLA (same engine) if you want to see how that works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
See the attached picture ... oil filter canister is circled in yellow. It is located at the rear of the engine compartment on the left side as you face the front of the car.

The oil drain plug is accessed by removing the plastic skid plate (what a contradiction in terms) that is mounted underneath the engine. It may be easier, quicker and less messy to invest in a suction pump to evacuate the oil through the dip stick tube. If you do that you will not have to get a drain plug crush washer every time you change the oil but evacuation *may* leave more oil in the crankcase than draining though. There is a YouTube video of someone sucking the oil out of a CLA (same engine) if you want to see how that works.
Thank you very much for taking time reply my question doyall. After looking around, I was able to locate them and got it done. However, the oil filter I purchased at Dealer, p/N A-276-180-00-09 which is a bit longer than the one I pulled out from engine. I searched on ebay, P/N is A-276-180-01-09 which seems to be the right one. Is there any advice on this oil filter?
I was able to take our the oil filter canister, but I could not take the filter out of canister to replace with new one. Therefore, this first time I just changed the oil without changing oil filter. It is holiday today, so I plan to stop by dealer ask if the part the gave me is correct or not (the last for digit are 01-09 or 00-09?
 

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I changed oil at apx. 2000 miles and did not change the filter but I was (and still remain) under the belief that the part number is 270 180 01 09.

276 180 00 09 looks to be for some other application all together.

The filter should have no problems going 10,000 miles. Bad mistake if the dealer gives you the wrong part. Let us know how it turns out.
 

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Guys, anyone used oil extractor for your oil change? Planing to do so.
It's less hassle to change the oil, you don't have to go under the car and...:nerd:
 

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what s this drain plug crush washer you refer to and can it be purchased at part store???? thanks....Tom
The crush washer (or 'sealing ring' as MB officially designates it) is a copper washer that goes between the oil drain plug and the oil pan. Its function is to provide a seal between the plug and pan to prevent oil from seeping out. Reusing the washer after draining the oil through the drain hole is not recommended although you *may* get lucky and not have a leak. The MB part # is N007603014106. They are relatively cheap. If you are going to change your own oil buy 10 or 12 and get a better price. I am sure that you could find aftermarket ones at a parts store but you want to make sure you get the right size (O.D 20mm I.D 14mm x 1.5 mm).
 

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Guys, anyone used oil extractor for your oil change? Planing to do so.
It's less hassle to change the oil, you don't have to go under the car and...:nerd:
I have done it and will do it again, although at some point I may try removing the drain plug after extraction to see how much oil is still in the pan.

I have heard others say that extraction is the method that the dealerships use. That would not surprise me since it is so much simpler to do it that way.
 

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I have done it and will do it again, although at some point I may try removing the drain plug after extraction to see how much oil is still in the pan.

I have heard others say that extraction is the method that the dealerships use. That would not surprise me since it is so much simpler to do it that way.
Yes, its conformed, dealerships do suck oil. I asked my service adviser about it. He conformed, that they are extracting oil from engine, because its faster and more efficient way to do it.
 

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Yes, its conformed, dealerships do suck oil. I asked my service adviser about it. He conformed, that they are extracting oil from engine, because its faster and more efficient way to do it.
Interesting, I'll have to check with my dealer at next change. Personally I would insist on drain given a choice. Better chance of removing sludge and solid particles that fall to the bottom from gravity.
 

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Good luck insisting on it - MB changed the oil change procedure when the W203 came out. That was the first set of engines from Benz that had no dipstick too. Not sure if our cars have them or not - haven't looked yet. In place of the dipstick was the tube itself, but a rubber cap on top. This was there purely to allow top-side oil change. Since I did my own changes back in the day, I bought a topsider and never looked back. Heck, if it's good enough for the manufacturer - should be good for me. And yes, it's quicker for them (they did it because they included maintenance at the time and were looking to get more margin) and it's easier on me. I'm dubious to this day about the method because of the metal filings all piling up in the bottom of the pan, but in theory they should all be going to the filter right?
 

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Good luck insisting on it - MB changed the oil change procedure when the W203 came out. That was the first set of engines from Benz that had no dipstick too. Not sure if our cars have them or not - haven't looked yet. In place of the dipstick was the tube itself, but a rubber cap on top. This was there purely to allow top-side oil change. Since I did my own changes back in the day, I bought a topsider and never looked back. Heck, if it's good enough for the manufacturer - should be good for me. And yes, it's quicker for them (they did it because they included maintenance at the time and were looking to get more margin) and it's easier on me. I'm dubious to this day about the method because of the metal filings all piling up in the bottom of the pan, but in theory they should all be going to the filter right?
USA 2016 GLA 250 models have a dipstick, I assume that the 2015 ones do too.
 

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I agree with Boxster that sucking the old oil out will leave ½ to a full pint of oil still in the engine with all the tiny crunchies and grindies still in it. The idea is to get rid of the broken down oil and the dirt in it, not to just make it convenient for some mechanic and give the dealer greater profit.


Always change the filter whenever doing an oil change.


I always open the old oil filter and inspect the element for metal. A cartridge-type filter is easy to cut or tear apart. With canister-types, I take it to the local airport FBO and use their filter cutter to cut off the threaded end; the filter element then easily pulls out for disassembly and inspection.


I catch and keep my waste oil in a 5-gallon paint pail. When I get it about ¾ full, I take it (my pail has a lid which protects against spillage) to a disposal place (in my case the local airport FBO has a waste oil tank. Many service (not just gas) stations have the same.).


Tom
2016 GLA250 4matic (ordered)

 

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I agree with Boxster that sucking the old oil out will leave ½ to a full pint of oil still in the engine with all the tiny crunchies and grindies still in it. The idea is to get rid of the broken down oil and the dirt in it, not to just make it convenient for some mechanic and give the dealer greater profit.


Always change the filter whenever doing an oil change.


I always open the old oil filter and inspect the element for metal. A cartridge-type filter is easy to cut or tear apart. With canister-types, I take it to the local airport FBO and use their filter cutter to cut off the threaded end; the filter element then easily pulls out for disassembly and inspection.


I catch and keep my waste oil in a 5-gallon paint pail. When I get it about ¾ full, I take it (my pail has a lid which protects against spillage) to a disposal place (in my case the local airport FBO has a waste oil tank. Many service (not just gas) stations have the same.).


Tom
2016 GLA250 4matic (ordered)


I totally agree, draining from the bottom is the way to go. Dealers have gotten lazy over the years and just siphon the oil from the top.

I have used Fumoto drain valves on all cars since the early 90's (including diesel/bi-turbo/non-turbo engines - I think 8 cars total).

Fumoto® USA | Quick and Easy Engine Oil Drain Valves

Makes draining the oil as easy as opening a valve. I have never had any issues. If you use the washer that comes with the valve and you never have to worry about crush washers either.

I just got one for my GLA45 (Fumoto part F-106) and will install it when I do my first oil change at 2,000 miles. I look up the valve number from the manufacturer's website and then buy the valve from Amazon. You can also get adapters if you need one. I have only needed an adapter on one car (Acura MD).

There is always sludge left at the bottom of the oil pan and definitely worth using gravity to help with that; otherwise, you are relying on a oil filter membranes to catch all that sludge.

Do not over-tighten the valve. Just follow their FAQ directions. I tend to tighten to where there is significant resistance and never had to retighten or deal with any leaks that way. Of course, it is totally subjective if you don't use a torque wrench. Here is the torque chart if you want to use a torque wrench: Size Chart | Fumoto® Engine Oil Drain Valves
 

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Good luck insisting on it - MB changed the oil change procedure when the W203 came out. That was the first set of engines from Benz that had no dipstick too. Not sure if our cars have them or not - haven't looked yet. In place of the dipstick was the tube itself, but a rubber cap on top. This was there purely to allow top-side oil change. Since I did my own changes back in the day, I bought a topsider and never looked back. Heck, if it's good enough for the manufacturer - should be good for me. And yes, it's quicker for them (they did it because they included maintenance at the time and were looking to get more margin) and it's easier on me. I'm dubious to this day about the method because of the metal filings all piling up in the bottom of the pan, but in theory they should all be going to the filter right?
As mentioned on another thread, I went to a new owner seminar last week, sponsored by the dealer service department, and asked about having oil changed through the bottom drain; the service manager said the customer is always right, if I wanted it changed through the bottom drain, that's what they would do. I assume it would cost more, since they might have to use a wrench?
 

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I had just had the 1 year maintenance done on my GLA45. AMGs at the dealer (North Palm Beach MB) get priority time (goes to first in line) and only in one area of the dealership service area and only with AMG certified techs. Great experience and they change the oil by draining not suction. Was in and out in 1.5 hours and service was the A type which included changing the rear diff fluid, replace air filter, oil change with new filter and about 10 other items.
 

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I had just had the 1 year maintenance done on my GLA45. AMGs at the dealer (North Palm Beach MB) get priority time (goes to first in line) and only in one area of the dealership service area and only with AMG certified techs. Great experience and they change the oil by draining not suction. Was in and out in 1.5 hours and service was the A type which included changing the rear diff fluid, replace air filter, oil change with new filter and about 10 other items.
I guess it's possible that, depending on how many AMGs are in the queue, we GLA250 folk may have a less great experience. Depending on how my car is doing at the one year point, I may have my local guy do the A, as I trust him big time.
 

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Why change it at home? The dealer does it so cheaply and my dealer even washes the car for you while it's there for free. Plus there's free gourmet coffee and free food in the waiting room.
 

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Why change it at home? The dealer does it so cheaply and my dealer even washes the car for you while it's there for free. Plus there's free gourmet coffee and free food in the waiting room.
I'll guess that "so cheaply" may not be entirely the case. Years of experience have taught me that there is no such thing as a free lunch.
 

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The Fumoto valve doesn't fit because the bump out from the lever hits the floor pan since the pan is recessed. I'm not sure an extension will be long enough? See attached pics.
 

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